The Times West Virginian

Bob Herzel

April 20, 2013

HERTZEL COLUMN: Trust has, so sadly, vanished

MORGANTOWN — This is hard.

It’s April, a time of rebirth. Flowers bloom. The cold, hard winter turns warm.

Baseball starts, which makes the oldest among us, of which I proudly proclaim myself, young at heart again.

In a college town like this, football returns with the spring game, as festive an event as you can imagine.

Former players return to town and merge in the mind’s eye with the players who represent the future, meaning the upcoming fall. Nothing like an April tailgate, a brew and a brat or a pepperoni roll and the sounds of “Country Roads” ringing out once again.

Football in this town is a religion, and to come and see old friends and talk about memories of football games past and dreams of future games, all of it eager to catch a look and see if the departure of Geno Smith, Stedman Bailey and Tavon Austin is really the end of the world.

Only this year, can you really think of the end of the world in terms of football with all that surrounds us this week?

What is a fumble or an interception when you think of it terms of a pressure cooker bomb on the finish line of the Boston Marathon, taking out the legs and lives of people who, just like you, were celebrating another right of spring less than a week earlier.

Then a couple of days later, down there in the heart of Big 12 country that has suddenly become our own playground, a fertilizer plant turns into a virtual nuclear weapon. West, Texas, is nearly destroyed under a mushroom cloud.

Fertilizer, which is supposed to make our flowers grow, which feeds the food that feeds us, becomes a weapon that ends lives in a town that sports writers and travelers have used as a popular rest stop on drives near Baylor or Texas.

Fertilizer!

What is this world coming to?

Why? That always is the question, and it usually is one with no answer … no real answer.

It’s a question I’ve been asking since the day I was born, for the very next day the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor.

Mine has been a wonderful life with joy coming from family and friends and sports and from a profession that has always given far more than I have taken from it.

But reality always has intruded, for that is the world in which we live. World War II, Korean War, Vietnam, Iraq … on and on.

Always it was horrible, our finest men and women fighting for freedom, sometimes coming back maimed, sometimes coming back dead … but it wasn’t happening at the World Trade Center in New York or on Boylston Street in Boston.

As I sit here writing this, thousands of law-enforcement agents are chasing a single villain, age 19, who set the bombs in Boston, running for his life when he failed to give others a chance to run for their own. His brother lies dead somewhere, died they say with a bomb attached to him so he could perform one final evil act.

You listen to friends and relatives of these two brothers and they seem unbelieving that they

could have performed such acts, could have housed such evil feelings within what they thought were relatively normal people.

One friend described him as a “fun kid,” “cheerful,” “never really mad at the world.” He noted that he was captain of the wrestling team, someone he looked up to, someone he could trust his life to. He even volunteered to help with Down syndrome.

All our lives we have believed that this couldn’t happen with an athlete, that the leadership from a coach, the spirit that grew out of the camaraderie of a team, the ethics and morals of playing by the rules would lead you into righteousness.

Oh, athletes make mistakes … big mistakes. We have read of horrible crimes, of rape, of murder from athletes we would never dream could act such a way, but these were crimes of passion, crimes of greed, but seldom crimes of terror and hatred.

I will try today, as you will, to enjoy this spring game, but I know I will not look at it as I have in the past, just as I no longer look at any sporting events as I looked at in the past, not after having been patted down and having my bag checked because in a country where you once trusted everyone you no longer can trust anyone.

Email Bob Hertzel at bhertzel@hotmail.com or follow him on Twitter @bhertzel.

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  • HERTZEL COLUMN: NCAA football is thriving in the digital age

    The other day Baylor football coach Art Briles walked into his graduate assistants’ office and had to laugh at what he saw.
    “There’s five guys sitting in there — a couple of GA’s and some office personnel — and they all are within a foot and a half of each other and not a one of them is talking to each other,” Briles said, describing the scene “Every one of them is on the phone.”

    April 24, 2014

  • O’Brien leads WVU baseball past Marshall

    Catcher Cam O’Brien made a bid at becoming only the second West Virginia University player to hit for the cycle as the Mountaineers jumped on Marshall early and routed their in-state rival, 10-3, behind strong pitching from Corey Walter and a pair of relievers.

    April 24, 2014

  • HERTZEL COLUMN- WVU faithful again have a reason to root against Vick

    It would be one final indignation, that’s what it would be if Michael Vick were to beat out Geno Smith and win the starting quarterback job with the New York Jets.

    April 23, 2014

  • HERTZEL COLUMN- Luck open to WVU fans’ suggestions

    West Virginia’s fans have spoken, perhaps not verbally but nonetheless have had their voices heard, over the past few years as attendance has fallen at the Mountaineers’ football and basketball games.

    April 22, 2014

  • Mountaineers ready for slate of rivalry games

    Looking to put together a late-season run to get into the NCAA championships, West Virginia faces a pair of midweek rivalry games in a crucial five-game week coming off winning two of three games at Oklahoma.

    April 22, 2014

  • HERTZEL COLUMN- Summer, Alabama will be used to get WVU’s mind right

    The ink had barely dried on the final reports out of West Virginia’s spring practice when thoughts turned forward toward the lazy, hazy days of late summer, days that will bring us into football season with a game that can either change the entire image of WVU football or sour it even further.

    April 21, 2014

  • HERTZEL COLUMN: Watson tees off a new century at The Greenbrier

    You knew this was going to be one of those unpredictable, memorable days when you drove into the Greenbrier Resort and headed to the Old White Golf Course and found the best parking place in the joint.
    As Bob Uecker would say, right there in the front rooooow.

    April 20, 2014

  • HERTZEL COLUMN: Under pressure, NCAA decides to change rules

    At first glance, it appears that they do not go hand-in-hand, a pair of rules changes the NCAA’s Legislative Council approved this week, sending them off for what seems to be smooth sailing toward becoming rules.

    April 18, 2014

  • HERTZEL COLUMN: WVU gymnast hopes to stick her final landing

    The reaction, one suspects, was the same as most people who see either a picture of West Virginia University gymnast Hope Sloanhoffer or meet her for the first time in person — a quick double take, maybe even stumbling over the first few words of an introduction.

    April 17, 2014

  • Bussie looks forward to WNBA

    On Tuesday, the weather turned cold, the wind blew and amongst the raindrops that fell a few snowflakes fluttered quietly to Earth.
    It was as if it was a celebration of Asya Bussie being drafted on Monday night by the Minnesota Lynx, champions of the WNBA, with the third selection of the second round, the 15th overall pick of the draft.

    April 16, 2014

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