The Times West Virginian

Z_CNHI News Service

October 11, 2013

EDITORIALS: Uncertain future for campaign finance; U.S. workers lag behind

(Continued)

That's just the kind of appearance of corruption - let alone actual corruption - that U.S. campaign finance laws were designed to prevent. The laws date to 1974, when they were crafted in response to the Watergate scandal. They were challenged on similar grounds two years later and at other points, but by and large they were upheld until three years ago.

The Court’s narrow 5-4 decision then suggests the upcoming decision will be close, as well, with conservatives favoring no limits and liberals supporting current laws.

For the past 40 years the president, Congress and the courts have let campaign finance restrictions stand as legitimate safeguards against corrupting American democracy. In the meantime, the influence of money has only grown. A decision that allows more money to flow directly to candidates will be a bigger step toward enabling corruption in a system many Americans feel is already stacked against them.

---------------------------------------------

Economy, technology leave behind American workers

(Cumberland, Md., Times-News)

Studies repeatedly tell us that America’s school students don’t compare well with those in other countries when it comes to learning skills, but now we find out our adults aren’t doing well, either.

The Program for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies said American grown-ups score below average when it comes to mathematics, reading and problem-solving using technology — all of which are vital skills in our modern world.

America is not alone. Countries like Italy and Spain, which are hard-hit by recession and debt, aren’t doing well, either.

By contrast countries including Japan, Canada, Australia and others in northern Europe — where economies are good — score higher.

American business owners frequently complain about finding qualified employees. Many applicants have trouble filling out job forms, putting together a resume or communicating in basic English.

Part of the problem is economic. It’s hard these days to succeed when your parents didn’t, though it wasn’t always the case. Technology has eliminated many blue-collar jobs that once enabled less educated Americans to lead successful lives. Technology also creates new jobs - the ones we’re having trouble filling.

Reacting to the study, U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan said America needs to help adults upgrade their skills, lest they be “stuck in place, unable to support their families and contribute fully to our country.”

That will be more easily said than done.

Text Only
Z_CNHI News Service
  • Police Brutality screen shot. Technology plays key part in battling police brutality (VIDEO)

    Allegations of police brutality are nothing new -- as long as there has been law enforcement, citizens have registered claims that some officers cross the line. But in the last few years, the claims of excessive force are being corroborated with new technology from cell phone cameras, police dash-cams and surveillance videos. 

    July 24, 2014 1 Photo

  • Lindley, Tom.jpg Better police needed for college teams enticed to cheat

    The NCAA once cracked down on colleges that went too far luring top prospects, then it targeted teams that lathered players with special treatment. That was until the NCAA's get-tough approach backfired, rendering it ineffective and creating an opportunity for those who want to play dirty.

    July 24, 2014 1 Photo

  • Facebook continues moneymaking trend

    Facebook seems to have figured out - for now at least - the holy grail for all media right now: how to make money selling mobile ads.

    July 24, 2014

  • Has the ipad lost its swag?

    July 24, 2014

  • Almost half of America's obese youth don't know they're obese

    The good news is that after decades of furious growth, obesity rates finally seem to be leveling off in the U.S.. The bad news is that America's youth still appear to be dangerously unaware of the problem.

    July 23, 2014

  • Lindley, Tom.jpg Expectations too high for a rehabbing Woods

    Tiger Woods finished near bottom last weekend at Royal Liverpool, drawing out his drought of major tournament wins. Despite the disappointing showing, Woods' return to form remains a matter of when, not if.

    July 22, 2014 1 Photo

  • 072214 Diamond Llama 1.jpg Llama on the loose corralled in Missouri town

    A llama on the lam cruised Main Street Tuesday before it mistook a resident’s fenced backyard for a place to grab a meal and freshen up.

    July 22, 2014 2 Photos

  • An oncologist uses scorpion venom to locate cancer cells

    Olson, a pediatric oncologist and research scientist in Seattle, has developed a compound he calls Tumor Paint. When injected into a cancer patient, it seems to light up all the malignant cells so surgeons can easily locate and excise them.

    July 22, 2014

  • Screen Shot 2014-07-22 at 2.00.42 PM.png VIDEO: Train collides with semi truck carrying lighter fluid

    A truck driver from Washington is fortunate to be alive after driving his semi onto a set of tracks near Somerset, Ky., and being struck by a locomotive, which ignited his load of charcoal lighter fluid.

    July 22, 2014 1 Photo

  • mama.jpg What we get wrong about millennials living at home

    If the media is to be believed, America is facing a major crisis. "Kids," some age 25, 26, or even 30 years old, are living out of their childhood bedrooms and basements at alarmingly high numbers. The hand-wringing overlooks one problem: It's all overblown.

    July 22, 2014 1 Photo

House Ads
Featured Ads