The Times West Virginian

Z_CNHI News Service

November 1, 2013

Health care choice another of Obama's broken promises

There is something fundamental about President Obama that too many Americans apparently do not understand: A promise is something he makes to achieve an objective – win an election, get a bill passed. It has nothing to do with telling the truth, nor is it something he feels the slightest moral obligation to keep.

He promised to close the military prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. He hasn’t, and likely won’t. He promised major reforms to the Patriot Act, to protect the rights and privacy of Americans. He has done the opposite. Every time a provision of that law has been due to expire, the president has pushed to extend it. And he has presided over the most massive spying operation on American citizens in history.

He promised his would be the “most transparent administration in history.” Instead, it has been the most opaque, even in the judgment of liberal journalists.

The list goes on, but you get the idea.

So I’m genuinely puzzled by the momentary tempest - It will pass in another few weeks, when it's trumped by whatever the Kardashians or Miley Cyrus are doing - over the president’s broken promise that, “If you like your doctor, you will be able to keep your doctor, period. If you like your health-care plan, you’ll be able to keep your health-care plan, period. No one will take it away, no matter what.”

It is a promise he made dozens upon dozens of times without any qualification or caveat.

Yet, as millions of Americans are finding out, no, they can’t keep it, no matter what. As conservative columnist Michelle Malkin observed recently, “Obama lied. My health plan died.”

What she and millions of others apparently missed is that the point of that line was not to tell the truth. It was to sell the product. Now that the product is, as the president’s people put it, “settled law,” they find what they call “manufactured outrage” amusing and juvenile.

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