The Times West Virginian

Local News

May 16, 2014

‘Bright’ EFMS impresses students, faculty

‘Amazed at what people have done for us, just for us to learn and get good grades’

FAIRMONT — Finally, after three years of construction, students have stepped foot inside the new East Fairmont Middle School.

“Oh my gosh, it’s beautiful!” a student yelled to his friends as they ran down the hallway.

Seventh- and eighth-graders left East Fairmont Junior High School and came into the building for the first time Thursday, and they will stay there for classes until the last day of school on June 5.

“We got all the kids together; they cleaned out their lockers and we walked over here as a group to our new home,” said special education teacher Susan Schrader.

Teachers took the children on tours of the school and helped them move into their new lockers. Students marked their classrooms on a map of the facility to make sure everyone knew where to find everyone else.

“The teachers are just trying to get them familiar with the environment as quickly as they can,” said Christy Miller, East Fairmont Middle’s principal.

They also went through the lunch line in the new cafeteria and practiced several fire drills throughout the day to give everyone an understanding of their evacuation routes.

Students also explored the school throughout the day as they changed classes.

“I think it’s a really good change because the last school was really dirty, and it was really just not something we wanted to be in,” said seventh-grader Leah Snider. “The new school is really clean and better.”

Her favorite part of the school so far is the bathroom, she said, and many other girls agreed. It does have a full-length mirror, after all, and there are doors on all the bathroom stalls.

Aside from the bathrooms, students noticed how bright the facility is compared to the old East Fairmont Junior High.

“All the bright yellows!” said Megan Gibson. “And the band room. I love the band room.”

Nathan Gerau also noticed the bright colors throughout the building and liked the yellow lockers.

“And the elevator,” he said. “There’s an elevator. I don’t know if we’re allowed to use it, but there’s an elevator.”

Teachers were just as excited about the building as the students.

“I think it’s beautiful,” said Jessie Long, the librarian. “I’m blown away by it. I think it’s amazing.”

The new library has more space, she said, and the new computers and technology will allow them to be better equipped for 21st-century learning.

“It opens up a lot of opportunities for more material, which is nice. It’ll be exciting to have the fifth and sixth grade. I have a big order of fifth- and sixth-grade books coming in sometime around June, so hopefully I’ll be able to fill more of the shelves. They’re a little empty right now.”

Miller made lesson plans for the teachers so they could focus on moving their supplies and their kids into the classroom.

Social studies classes discussed the site’s historical aspects, and students wrote descriptions of the school during their reading/language arts classes.

They learned about energy conservation in science classes because the facility has several features that help control energy costs.

In math, students calculated the building’s square footage.

The children agreed they are happy to have a clean, new environment — a welcome change from East Fairmont Junior High, they said.

“That school was really run down, and people didn’t take really good care of it,” Kyra Miller said. “... We needed a new school.”

Snider believes the new facility will help students learn and focus better, she said.

“There’s new things here. It’s a different environment, so it gets your brain going more,” she said.

The fifth- and sixth-graders are coming to tour the building during the last week of school this year and will come full time next fall to join the seventh and eighth grades.

“Kids will actually be amazed at what people have done for us, just for us to learn and get good grades,” said seventh-grader Megan Gibson.

Email Chelsi Baker at cbaker@timeswv.com or follow her on Twitter @cbakerTWV.

1
Text Only
Local News
  • Children's Hospital Donation 2 - CB.jpg Students raise money for WVU Children’s Hospital

    Children from Sunbeam Early Learning Center visited West Virginia University’s Children’s Hospital Wednesday to make a special delivery.
    Two students, Niasia Payne, 10, and Desiree Balch, 11, held a bake sale at Sunbeam July 9 and 10 to raise money for the hospital and set a goal for $50.

    July 24, 2014 1 Photo

  • Fairmont seeks to rebrand itself

    The city of Fairmont is starting to try to reach out to residents in new ways.
    The city created a new position, Fairmont program manager of marketing and communications, to help facilitate the effort.
    Hanna Weaver said she started the job around four weeks ago. She is originally from the Eastern Panhandle and Potomac Highlands region, and her previous job was working as executive director of the Grant County Convention and Visitors Bureau.

    July 24, 2014

  • TWV, ARC sponsoring blood drive Friday at FSHS

    The American Red Cross is facing a blood shortage.
    According to the American Red Cross, there have been 80,000 fewer blood donations given since May than expected. This has created an urgent need for blood donations as the Red Cross may soon face a blood shortage.

    July 24, 2014

  • Bridgeport man charged with threatening officer

    A plaintiff in a four-year-old fraud cause is now being accused of not only threatening a State Police officer, but also the lives of the officer’s wife and children.
    Christopher John Domico, 37, of Bridgeport, was arrested Wednesday and charged with retaliation against public officers and witnesses.

    July 24, 2014

  • Mary Jane and Patches -ts.jpg Can-Do campers learn about emergency safety: PHOTOS

    Patches and his fire truck “pumper” made a special visit to the Can-Do summer camp.
    Can-Do summer camp, held at the Disability Action Center, is a week-long camp that is intended for individuals with disabilities. Wednesday began with a lesson about emergency safety.

    July 24, 2014 6 Photos

  • Korean War Memorial seeks funds from county commission

    The Korean War Memorial was suggested to be completed in phases.
    Marion County Development office director Charlie Reese was assigned to review and make a recommendation on what steps the memorial needs to complete to earn more funding. During the last meeting, the Korean War Memorial project had requested $8,000.

    July 24, 2014

  • Fairmont reaching out in new ways

    The city of Fairmont is starting to try to reach out to residents in new ways.

    July 23, 2014

  • Police: Plaintiff threatens trooper, wife and children

    A plaintiff in a four-year-old fraud cause is now being accused of not only threatening a State Police officer, but the lives of his wife and children.

    July 23, 2014

  • Children's Hospital Daycare bake sale reaches 10 times goal for children's hospital

    Children from Sunbeam Early Learning Center visited West Virginia University's Children's Hospital today to make a special delivery.

    July 23, 2014 1 Photo

  • Rescue Squad at DAC.jpg Patches teaches home safety to DAC campers

    Patches and his fire truck “pumper” made a special visit to the Can-Do summer camp.

    July 23, 2014 1 Photo

Featured Ads
TWV Video Highlights
NDN Editor's Picks
House Ads